Learning Series > Robertson
ROBERTSON Huang-Lee HSIIBS IBCP
I CAN STILL MAKE A DIFFERENCE By AMY HUANG LEE
I CAN STILL MAKE A DIFFERENCE By AMY HUANG LEE W'01

When we were young, we used to write essays about how we can make a difference in the world when we grow up. Now that we are grown up, have we made a difference? Looking back over the years, it feels like I made more difference in school than I did as a working adult. At school, you constantly had someone pushing you to strive, to achieve, to excel, and to give¡­of your time, your efforts, and your ideals. Now that we are grown adults, we seldom push ourselves to make a difference in our work place, our community, our country, or our world. We get lost in the daily grind, tending to family duties, catching up with friends,

trying to stay fit, driving through the long commute, sending out endless emails, keeping up with Twitter and all the latest fads, getting enough sleep, and maybe indulging in our hobbies. With all that going on and maybe 16 hours of awake time during the day, how much time do we allocate to making a difference in the world?

I did a thorough soul searching after the arrival of my first baby. My priorities have changed as my world widened to a whole new arena. As I prepared to go back to work, I suddenly felt that I wanted to make a difference again. I wanted to reclaim the ideals of youth, to feel that I can conquer the world, and to dream that if I tried hard enough, I can make a difference! It¡¯s not just enough to go to work and bring back a paycheck at the end of the month. There¡¯s got to be more.

For me, I decided to open myself to new ideas and new people, to be more tolerant, and to spend less time being involved in my own world. Start with the small things, and if it makes a difference with one person, then I made a difference. I found that by caring more about other people¡¯s lives, being more involved in the community, I could see a change in the world around me. I may not be Barack Obama, who can change the world with a sweeping signature or a round of talks. But these small differences matter absolutely! In a country as rapidly developing and changing as China, each positive contribution to the society will build towards a better place for the future generations. Isn¡¯t that what we built our ideals on when we were young?


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June 2009